The study, published in the academic journal Phytomedicine, also suggests this ancient Chinese remedy could play a vital role in protecting the body against cancer.

Led by Dr Ed Okello, the Newcastle team wanted to know if the protective properties of green tea -- which have previously been shown to be present in the undigested, freshly brewed form of the drink -- were still active once the tea had been digested.

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Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110105194844.htm

Posted 4/23/2014
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The above story is based on materials provided by Newcastle University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length

Journal Reference:

  1. E.J. Okello, G.J. McDougall, S. Kumar, C.J. Seal. In vitro protective effects of colon-available extract of Camellia sinensis (tea) against hydrogen peroxide and beta-amyloid (Aβ(1–42)) induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 cells. Phytomedicine, 2010; DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2010.11.004

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Tea and tea containing products are not intended to treat, cure or prevent any disease or illness. You should always consult a physician regarding the applicability of any information or recommendations with respect to any symptoms or medical condition.
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